Documents pour «improvisation»

Embodied minds

Tommi HIMBERG

1h26min04

Interacting minds: combining art and science to explore the social, dynamic, and embodied nature of human cognition   In this series of three seminars, we will discuss the view of "extended cognition", or how to bring social interactions, the dynamic feedback loops between us and our environments, and our bodies into the study of the mind. Particular focus will be in how the cross-exposure from art and science can reveal phenomena about our minds, sociality and interactions that would be impossible for either to reach alone.  We will look at "improvised interactions" in music, dance, and decision-making, peruse literature from neuroscience, social psychology, cognitive science and philosophy, and see how recent scientific advances (both theoretical and methodological) have changed our view of how the mind works, and form ideas of how we should study it. We will exchange experiences and ideas about how to best combine artistic and scientific practices and ideas. Seminar 1: Social minds (2.11.)  What does it mean if we see sociality as the "default mode" of humans interacting with their environment and not as the top end of a tall ladder of elementary, individual functions? How are art and empathy linked? Seminar 2: Dynamic minds (15.11.) Statics of the dynamic mind: what changes if we look at the social minds in motion? In psychology and neuroscience we talk of states, e.g. "emotional states", or measure behaviours in trials where we assume the behaviour to switch on at the beginning and continue until the beep at the end. Performing arts know better: being static is a statement; it is not natural; it might even be dead.  Seminar 3: Embodied minds (22.11.)  One of the first extensions to cognitive science was the embodied approach: the mind/brain is a part of a body, and the body is not only for carrying the brain around. But embodiment often seems like a popular but empty buzzword; having learned so much about the mind since the inception of embodied cognition, what should embodied cognition 2.0 look like?

Dynamic minds

Tommi HIMBERG

2h04min20

Interacting minds: combining art and science to explore the social, dynamic, and embodied nature of human cognition   In this series of three seminars, we will discuss the view of "extended cognition", or how to bring social interactions, the dynamic feedback loops between us and our environments, and our bodies into the study of the mind. Particular focus will be in how the cross-exposure from art and science can reveal phenomena about our minds, sociality and interactions that would be impossible for either to reach alone.  We will look at "improvised interactions" in music, dance, and decision-making, peruse literature from neuroscience, social psychology, cognitive science and philosophy, and see how recent scientific advances (both theoretical and methodological) have changed our view of how the mind works, and form ideas of how we should study it. We will exchange experiences and ideas about how to best combine artistic and scientific practices and ideas. Seminar 1: Social minds (2.11.)  What does it mean if we see sociality as the "default mode" of humans interacting with their environment and not as the top end of a tall ladder of elementary, individual functions? How are art and empathy linked? Seminar 2: Dynamic minds (15.11.) Statics of the dynamic mind: what changes if we look at the social minds in motion? In psychology and neuroscience we talk of states, e.g. "emotional states", or measure behaviours in trials where we assume the behaviour to switch on at the beginning and continue until the beep at the end. Performing arts know better: being static is a statement; it is not natural; it might even be dead.  Seminar 3: Embodied minds (22.11.)  One of the first extensions to cognitive science was the embodied approach: the mind/brain is a part of a body, and the body is not only for carrying the brain around. But embodiment often seems like a popular but empty buzzword; having learned so much about the mind since the inception of embodied cognition, what should embodied cognition 2.0 look like?

Social Minds

Tommi HIMBERG

2h08min06

Interacting minds: combining art and science to explore the social, dynamic, and embodied nature of human cognition In this series of three seminars, we will discuss the view of "extended cognition", or how to bring social interactions, the dynamic feedback loops between us and our environments, and our bodies into the study of the mind. Particular focus will be in how the cross-exposure from art and science can reveal phenomena about our minds, sociality and interactions that would be impossible for either to reach alone. We will look at "improvised interactions" in music, dance, and decision-making, peruse literature from neuroscience, social psychology, cognitive science and philosophy, and see how recent scientific advances (both theoretical and methodological) have changed our view of how the mind works, and form ideas of how we should study it. We will exchange experiences and ideas about how to best combine artistic and scientific practices and ideas. Seminar 1: Social minds (2.11.) What does it mean if we see sociality as the "default mode" of humans interacting with their environment and not as the top end of a tall ladder of elementary, individual functions? How are art and empathy linked? Seminar 2: Dynamic minds (15.11.) Statics of the dynamic mind: what changes if we look at the social minds in motion? In psychology and neuroscience we talk of states, e.g. "emotional states", or measure behaviours in trials where we assume the behaviour to switch on at the beginning and continue until the beep at the end. Performing arts know better: being static is a statement; it is not natural; it might even be dead. Seminar 3: Embodied minds (22.11.) One of the first extensions to cognitive science was the embodied approach: the mind/brain is a part of a body, and the body is not only for carrying the brain around. But embodiment often seems like a popular but empty buzzword; having learned so much about the mind since the inception of embodied cognition, what should embodied cognition 2.0 look like?

Nawell Madani - C'est moi la plus Belge

De Thierry Teston

1h56min51

Dans son spectacle, qui a remporté le prix du « Meilleur One Man Show » aux Globes de Cristal, Nawell Madani se livre dans un portrait autobiographique à la fois drôle, émouvant, féministe et engagé. Se moquant ainsi des garçons, comme des filles et des clichés. Elle hypnotise le public et l’emmène aux premières loges de son parcours. Vannes, danse, musique et improvisation prennent corps dans ce show au charme fou et à l’énergie communicative.   La nouvelle bombe du rire ose tout !

Etage X

Francy Fabritz

13min54

Deux dames âgées se retrouvent coincées ensemble dans l’ascenseur d’un grand magasin, ce qui va les pousser à leurs limites et les obliger à improviser.

EyeDance : Le regard en performance

Coline JOUFFLINEAU

14min21

Présentation et retour sur l’installation performative et expérimentale. Dans le cadre du projet Labodance en collaboration avec Mélanie Perrier.

Joint Improvisation Meetings 2015

15min10

We understand joint improvisation as an artistic form involving two or more performers engaging in multiple real-time interactions: with each other, with the audience and with the emerging content. Improvisers freely explore, within some boundaries, a large space of possibilities for new joint discoveries.

 While joint improvisation has long standing history in dance, music and theatre, its scholarship as a unified phenomenon, in particular from a scientific perspective, is still in its infancy. Moreover, the perspective of joint improvisation is useful in studying a range of human phenomena beyond the boundaries of the artistic arena, including conversation, scientific co-discovery and the dynamics of groups operating in emergency situations.

 The “Science of Joint Improvisation” meeting aims to bring together researchers from a number of different fields to establish a rigorous study of joint improvisation. First, the conference will bring together researchers that currently apply a scientific approach to study joint improvisation, using different paradigms – verbal report analysis, kinematic measurements, brain imaging and mathematical modeling. Second, the conference is open to researchers from different subfields of cognitive and behavioral sciences, social sciences and philosophy that study topics highly related to group improvisation, such as group creativity, aesthetic perception, linguistics, kinesthetic empathy and the human ‘mirror system’. We also see joint improvisation as a specific case of joint action, and look forward to contributions of experts from this growing field. Contributions from practitioners of improvisation will also be welcome.
The aim of this meeting is to foster scientific investigation of joint improvisation as a unique phenomenon, and as a rich novel ground for an ecological study of a number of central questions regarding human nature. The workshop is supported by the DIM cerveau & pensée (Ile de France).

Going into the unknown in science and art

Christian KEYSERS

1h06min12

Scientists must grope into the undefined place beyond the known. So must improvisation theater actorswalking onto the stage with no idea what will happen next. Improvisation theater developed practices thathelp groups of actors create a new scene on the spot, by focusing on mutual support: saying yes to eachothers ideas and bypassing the inner critic that spoils our spontaneity. I’ll describe how as a scientist by dayand improvisation actor by night, I learned from theater how to do better science. The concepts are universaland can apply to unexpected situations across disciplines.

“Quantifying JI” Short talk 1.4 Debate.

Ashley WALTON

23min43

“Quantifying JI” Debate.

“Quantifying JI” Short talk 1.1: Saul Albert - Extemporary movement: an interactional account of partner dance improvisation

Albert SAUL

15min29

Clear empirical distinctions can be drawn between joint improvisation and choreography in dance by exploring the rhythmical coordination of dancers and audience members in a partner dance performance. Novice dancers typically learn footwork patterns or ’basics’ that help them move in time to music together. Experts’ familiarity with basics, as well as conventional variations and set­piece moves form a set of compositional structures that can be linked together to fit complimentary rhythmical patterns in music on the fly. In a ’social dance’ performance such as the Lindy hop, (an African American vernacular jazz dance from which the data for this study is drawn), dancers link together basics with set­piece moves along with moments of joint improvisation. These improvised movements are literally extemporaneous ­ they move out of the temporal regularities of mutually learned patterns and rely on other kinds of interactional resources and methods to achieve coordination. This paper analyses rhythmical coordination between dancers and audience members clapping along to a Lindy hop performance in a naturalistic setting using data drawn from a Youtube video. This empirical starting point enables a tractable analysis of the haptic, visual, and semantic structures and processes used for coordinating extemporaneous dance movements. Audience members’ rhythmical responses to these processes also provides insight into long­standing problems of measurement and meaning in empirical aesthetics. Music and dance psychology tend to emphasise psychophysical measures and post­hoc report as proxies for aesthetic response. This paper proposes new ways to use the observable patterns of rhythmical coordination to explore joint improvisation as part of an interactional sense­making practice

Improvising Interaction

Patrick HEALEY

43min11

Even the most tightly scripted solo performances involve improvisation; the detailed execution of each note or word cannot be completely determined in advance. In joint performances the challenge of co­ordinating the actions of multiple people in real­time becomes even more complex. One response to this challenge has involved appeal to prediction using ‘forward models’ from computational models of action planning. These models involve automatic activation of motor representations of the future perceptual consequences of an unfolding action. Although normally associated with action production, if a person perceiving the action can also produce a forward model they can predict what word or note will come next. An important problem with this approach is that it is by definition conservative. It only works for familiar or rehearsed actions and cannot account for the production of novel or improvised responses. Using case studies from free jazz improvisation and conversation I will illustrate this problem for natural co­ordinated action. Rather than relying on access to pre­established shared representations, constructive engagement in these situations requires mechanisms that enable people to adapt and create new conventions on the fly i.e. improvise. I will argue that the key processes through which this is achieved are the interactional processes of ‘repair’ that we use to detect and deal with things that do not go as expected. These mechanisms are not auxiliary but rather provide the fundamental foundations on which all successful human interaction depends.

Brain to Brain approaches to joint actions

Christian KEYSERS

1h02min40

Joint actions require an ability to understand and predict the actions of others far enough into the future to have time to plan and execute matching motor programs. Here I will review experiments in which we have tracked information flow from one brain to another to show that the motor system seems to play a key role in these functions. I will embed this experimental data in a Hebbian learning model, which posits that predictions are the result of synaptic plasticity during self­observation. Jointly this talk will aim to trigger thoughts on how we can study the involvement of the motor system in coordinating actions across individuals